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Friday, July 29, 2011
Before we put up John MacArthur’s second post in the series—what amounts to some fatherly advice to the Young, Restless, and Reformed folks—I’d like to interject a few thoughts for your consideration...
Monday, July 25, 2011
When Paul told Timothy, "Let no one despise you for your youth" (1 Timothy 4:12), he wasn't suggesting that Timothy should forbid people in the church to disapprove if the pastor were to display immaturity, juvenile misbehavior, youthful indiscretion, or other traits of callow character...
Wednesday, July 20, 2011
It has been five years since Christianity Today published Collin Hansen’s article titled “Young, Restless, Reformed.” Hansen later expanded the article into a book with the same title (Wheaton: Crossway, 2008). He has carefully documented a very encouraging trend: large numbers of young people (college age and younger) are discovering the doctrines of grace, embracing a more biblical and Christ-centered worldview, and beginning to delve more deeply into serious theology than most 20th-century evangelicals were prone to do.
Tuesday, July 19, 2011
Whether you’re reading the morning paper or driving to work, you’re certain to encounter one of the most pervasive reminders of our humanity—change. Birth announcements, obituaries, construction, demolition—change riddles God’s creation...
Tuesday, July 12, 2011
Have you ever spoken to an unbeliever who knew some of his Bible—just enough to be angry and confused? If so, you probably heard questions (accusations) like these: “What kind of God orders the slaughter of entire cities—women, children, and animals included—without mercy? Why does God allow so much pain, suffering, and evil in the world? How do you reconcile the love of God with the eternal flames of hell?”
Wednesday, July 06, 2011
I can still remember the chair I was sitting in years ago when I read a life-changing page in John MacArthur’s book The God Who Loves. In an economy of words, John exposed, confronted, and changed my thinking on one of the most critical areas of theology, the nature of God. My understanding of God’s love—specifically His love for the non-elect—was never the same...